Blessed Christians

Blessed Christians
Christlikeness — receiving with one hand to give with the other…

Christians are Blessed

Christians are a blessing. They are a blessing because having received freely, they give just as freely. In this way, Christians follow Jesus’ teachings who taught that it is more blessed to give than to receive.

God lavished his grace upon us. God in Christ reconciled the world to himself. God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world. Therefore, when God sends us into the world, it is not to condemn the world. That is why Christians everywhere are known for passing on God’s grace and forgiveness as lavishly as God gave it to Christians themselves!

Christians are a Blessing

So it is that Christians are known to forswear all hatreds and bigotries. Instead they speak grace and peace in a world torn by war and strife. They are not warriors but healers. Just as Jesus stood above the fray, so do Christians. And when caught in the crossfire, they accept wounds without offense or retaliation. Like Jesus, they answer with blessing.

Christians recognize the brokenness and weakness of the little people of the world. Christians bind their wounds, stand by them and defend them. But Christians stand far from slander. They know slander is the Satan’s work. And when prejudices do lead to slander, Christians are the first to stand beside the afflicted to bear Satan’s lash with them. Christians take seriously Jesus’ admonition to love their enemies, and to do them good. Moreover, Christians do this in consistent, loving and concrete ways.

Counter-Cultural Living

Christians do these things all the time. They expect nothing in return. They live simple, sacrificial, counter-cultural lives for the good of others. Christians have no scores to settle because they keep no record of injuries received. They just do their deeds and are blissfully unaware that they are doing them. As followers of Jesus, this is the only way they know.

This is why Christians are highly regarded in our society.

4 thoughts on “Blessed Christians”

  1. As I read this, I could feel the selfishness rising up in me. It crossed my mind that being a Christian feels a bit like being a doormat. But, then I clicked on the link at the end and saw the picture of Jesus washing Peter’s feet. And that’s exactly what Jesus was doing – essentially being a doormat. It’s humbling to think of how much I fight this concept.

    Jesus said that we would have to take up crosses to follow him. I have always believed that those crosses were a bunch of rules… I assumed that the cross I was to carry was essentially “the law.” But, it now occurs to me that that cross is possibly the opposite – grace. Grace towards others. I’m not sure which is harder to carry. It’s difficult to be wounded by others and to remain silent. Silence seems like weakness, yet it takes incredible strength.

    Christianity seems quite paradoxical. He chose the foolish things to put to shame the wise. I’m not entirely sure what this means. But passiveness, forgiveness, absorbing hatred and abuse, and loving in return all seem like weakness, like foolishness. Yet they really aren’t. I’m not sure that these things “shame the wise,” it often seems like they embolden the wise. But, no one could question the strength of Jesus, and he remained silent while his body was abused to the point of death.

    The right path, he called “narrow” and said there were few who would find it.

    Quite a bit to think about here. Thank you.

  2. This was well written and a view of Christianity that flies in the face of IFB and much of today’s view of Christianity. Like First Time Caller said I too use to believe that taken up my cross and following “rules” gave me the blessing of a Christian. But in the end I realized I was just being an annoying, selfish and smug person, and it did cause people to see Christ.

  3. It’s in the Bible, over and over, and yet I think I’ve kind of missed the point.

    The first will be last.

    Love bears all things.

    Present your bodies as living sacrifices.

    He made himself of no reputation, took upon himself the form of a servant, became obedient to death.

    The ideas were right there, but somehow it’s easy to explain them away. To assume that being a living sacrifice just means refraining from sin, when maybe it is meant to be a positive rather than a negative… instead of it meaning that we should give up things we desire, maybe instead it means that we welcome what we really don’t desire.

    John the Baptist was sent in the spirit of Elijah, and yet he died in a prison cell, all alone.

    Jesus was taunted, “He saved others, but himself he cannot save.” He wouldn’t save himself. He died alone as well. Did he feel invisible, as his friends scattered and left him in his darkest hour? As he listened to them taunt him, and he didn’t open his mouth… on what did he focus his thoughts? Was his love for us, and the knowledge of the glory to come enough in those moments? Is this what is asked of us all? To put ourselves last, not by resisting sin, but by literally putting ourselves last?

    And again, the feelings of selfishness rise in me.

    To allow others to cause harm is hard, but to do so with humility and acceptance is harder. To embrace what we are repulsed by… we need incredible grace to do so.

  4. “So it is that Christians are known to forswear all hatreds and bigotries. Instead they speak grace and peace in a world torn by war and strife. They are not warriors but healers. Just as Jesus stood above the fray, so do Christians. And when caught in the crossfire, they accept wounds without offense or retaliation. Like Jesus, they answer with blessing.”

    Jesus didn’t always speak grace and peace. He was a warrior and a healer, but his fight was not carnal. He never stood above the fray, but was in the midst of it, his words the weapons used against the enslaving systems of civilization.

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